We represent all sorts of whistleblowers, from blue collar workers seeking to correct unsafe conditions to business executives opposing corporate fraud. Numerous state and federal laws protect employees who dare take a stand and blow the whistle.

If you’re thinking about blowing the whistle, you’ve come to the right place. Our attorneys can help guide you through how to blow the whistle while protecting your career. There are many things to consider before speaking out. For example, should you try to remain anonymous? Should you report the problems internally to your direct supervisor, the HR manager, or a government agency? Does your disclosure need to be in writing? Do you work within the Intelligence Community or handle information regulated by HIPAA? We can guide you through these issues and more, and help you protect your livelihood.

Other important factors to consider include the industry you work in and the nature of the issue that you’re reporting, whether you work for a public or private employer, and who is being harmed by the wrongful conduct.

Not all whistleblowing is protected, and many whistleblower protection laws have procedures that must be strictly followed. Whistleblower laws pertaining to government employees, workplace safety, and the environment also tend to have very short deadlines in which to report to the government any forms of retaliation.

If you’re thinking about blowing the whistle, you owe it to yourself, your career, and your family to talk to an experienced whistleblower attorney.

Below is a list of just some of the many areas in which we assist whistleblowers.

Can my employer retaliate against me?

The short answer is “no.” Section 3730(h) prohibits an employer from retaliating against an employee or a subcontractor for attempting to uncover or report fraud against the federal government. Any employee who is “discharged, demoted, suspended, threatened, harassed, or in any other manner discriminated against… by his or her employer because of lawful acts done by the employee… shall be entitled to all relief necessary to make the employee whole,” which may include reinstatement, back pay, two times the amount of back pay, litigation costs, and attorney’s fees.

So What Should You Do?

Collect all the information you can about the fraud that you’ve observed and contact us. You don’t have to leave your job to file a complaint under the False Claims Act or the related whistleblower programs. It may be crucial to the case that you keep your job so that you can provide the government with up-to-date information.